april 1–15, 2016

Books

  • China Miéville, Embassytown
  • Idra Novey, Ways to Disappear
  • Georges Simenon, Three Bedrooms in Manhattan, translated by Marc Romano & Lawrence R. Blochman
  • Samuel R. Delany, The Jewels of Aptor
  • Samuel R. Delany, The Ballad of Beta-2
  • Helen Phillips, The Beautiful Bureaucrat
  • Georges Simenon, Act of Passion, trans. Louise Varèse
  • Roald Dahl, Switch Bitch
  • Roald Dahl, My Uncle Oswald
  • Samuel R. Delany, They Fly at Çiron

Exhibits

  • Liwan Museum, Guangzhou
  • “Shen Shaomin: There Is No Problem,” Redtory Museum of Contemporary Art, Guangzhou
  • “Chinese Printmaking New Scene,” Tap Seac Gallery, Macau

march 16–31, 2016

Books

  • Álvaro Mutis, The Adventures and Misadventures of Maqroll, translated by Edith Grossman
  • Georges Simenon, Tropic Moon, trans. Marc Romano
  • Georges Simenon, Dirty Snow, trans. Marc Romano
  • Georges Simenon, Mr. Hire’s Engagement, trans. Daphne Woodward
  • Hisham Matar, In the Country of Men
  • Georges Simenon, Monsieur Monde Vanishes, trans. Jean Stewart
  • Georges Simenon, The 13 Culprits, trans. Peter Schulman

Films

  • Dark Passage, dir. Delmer Daves
  • Macao, dir. Josef von Sternberg & Nicholas Ray
  • The Big Knife, dir. Robert Aldrich
  • The Creature from the Black Lagoon, dir. Jack Arnold
  • The Anthem, dir. Apichatpong Weerasethakul
  • Kids in the Hall: Brain Candy, dir. Kelly Makin
  • The Forbidden Room, dir. Guy Maddin & Evan Johnson
  • The Queen Of Versailles, dir. Lauren Greenfield

march 1–15, 2016

Books

  • Gabriele D’Annunzio, The Child of Pleasure, translated by Georgina Harding
  • Susanne Kircher, A Roman Scandal: The Story of Beatrice Cenci
  • Mihail Sebastian, For Two Thousand Years, trans. Philip Ó Ceallaigh

Films

  • What Happened, Miss Simone?, directed by Liz Garbus
  • Hail, Caesar!, dir. Joel & Ethan Coen

there has not always been snow outside

“And what I really wish to record – as if otherwise I might forget it – is merely that there has not always been snow outside, that much else has occurred during this past year, bloom and harvest and the fragrance of resin throughout the woods, water dripping and trickling down over the rocks of the face of the Kuppron, wind blowing from afar and dying away, light that flamed and faded, and skies that changed from day to night and back again to day. All this occurred while my heart was beating, while wind and sun and clouds were there, all of them flowing through my hands and my heart.”

(Hermann Broch, The Spell, trans. H. F. Broch de Rotherman, p. 6.)

february 15–29, 2016

Books

  • John Keene, Annotations
  • William S. Wilson, With Ray: The Art of Friendship
  • Eka Kurniawan, Man Tiger, translated by Labodalih Sembiring
  • John Fowles, The French Lieutenant’s Woman
  • Ann Beattie, Mrs. Nixon
  • Elizabeth McKenzie, The Portable Veblen

Films

  • Times Square, directed by Allan Moyle
  • The East, dir. Zal Batmanglij

other than the world that is

“You may think novelists always have fixed plans to which they work, so that the future predicted by Chapter One is always inexorably the actuality of Chapter Thirteen. But novelists write for countless different reasons: for money, for fame, for reviewers, for parents, for friends, for loved ones; for vanity, for pride, for curiosity, for amusement: as skilled furniture-makers enjoy making furnitures, as drunkards like drinking, as judges like judging, as Sicilians like emptying a shotgun into an enemy’s back. I could fill a book with reasons, and they would all be true, though not true at all. Only one same reason is shared by all of us: we wish to create worlds as real as, but other than the world that is. Or was. This is why we cannot plan. We know a world is an organism, not a machine. We also know that a genuinely created world must be independent of its creator; a planned world (a world that fully reveals its planning) is a dead world. It is only when our characters and events begin to disobey us that they begin to live.”

(John Fowles, The French Lieutenant’s Woman, p. 86.)

february 1–15, 2016

Books

  • Eugène Sue, The Mysteries of Paris, translated by Carolyn Betensky & Jonathan Loesberg
  • Muriel Rukeyser, The Life of Poetry

Films

  • No, directed by Pablo Larraín

Exhibits

  • “Michael Shaowanasai’s Revisits,” Art Center, Chulalongkorn University
  • “Roa/Kult,” Bridge Art Space
  • “L’Amour,” Sathorn 11 Art Space
  • “Jean-Sebastien Faure: Lonely in Bangkok,” Kathmandu Photo Gallery
  • “Kodsoung Eangubon: Egoism,” Number 1 Gallery

january 16–31, 2016

Books

  • Kamel Daoud, The Mersault Investigation, trans. John Cullen
  • Rattawut Lapcharoensap, Sightseeing
  • Erin Hogan, Spiral Jetta: A Road Trip Through the Land Art of the American West
  • Tove Jannson, Sculptor’s Daughter: A Childhood Memoir, trans. Kingsley Hart
  • Olaf Stapledon, Odd John
  • Multatuli, Max Havelaar, trans. Roy Edwards

Films

  • The King of Comedy, directed by Martin Scorsese

january 1–15, 2016

Books

  • Eka Kurniawan, Beauty Is a Wound, translated by Annie Tucker
  • Jenny Offill, Dept. of Speculation
  • Ellery Queen, Q.E.D.: Queen’s Experiments in Detection
  • Ellery Queen, The Last Woman in His Life
  • Ellery Queen, A Fine and Private Place

Films

  • The Big Short, directed by Adam McKay
  • Kramer vs. Kramer, dir. Robert Benton
  • Cartel Land, dir. Matthew Heineman